It’s About That Time

Equinoctial Ngram

It’s about that time. Yeah, you know what I’m talking about: the equinox. No, not that equinox — the other one.

I thought I had little or nothing to say about the subject. As is so often the case, once I got to writing, I discovered how wrong I was. The result is a column so monstrously large, it had to be split in two.

And as if that wasn’t enough, I’ve also put together a mix of autumnal equinox music.

Six Long Essays

Contemplation (Green)

I’ve been doing it again: writing elsewhere.

I’ve just finished up a series of six essays for College Contemplative on the topic of “Contemplative Faculty Development.”

  1. Introduction
  2. My Story
  3. Stepping into Silence
  4. The Transformative Banquet
  5. Sustaining the Dialog
  6. What’s Next

Read at your own risk; I apologize in advance for the length.

I wrote these in preparation for the Fifth Annual Conference of the Association for Contemplative Mind in Higher Education where I presented on this same topic. More to come.

Top Ten Referrers

Here’s the top ten referrers to this blog since, um, well whenever it was I installed this new stats package.

  1. adrastos.blog-city.com 274
  2. michaelhoman.blogspot.com 185
  3. librarychronicles.blogspot.com 154
  4. righthandthief.blogspot.com 136
  5. tanque.org 98
  6. toulousestreet.wordpress.com 72
  7. google.com/ig 71
  8. mcno.org 66
  9. flickr.com/photos/editor 56
  10. howieluvzus.com 54

Respect!

Zogby on Katrina

Back in September of 2005, I wondered if Katrina would become an campaign issue in 2008. Now pollster John Zogby says it just might:

73 percent say the U.S is in a serious crisis, according to our recent polling.

This suggests a need to redefine the very nature and structure of U.S. federalism. In our post-Katrina polling, we found a hunger nationwide for a new model for the federal government. In many ways, I believe Katrina, over the long haul, will prove to be more of a defining moment in American history than the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

Update: Leigh Graham has some additional analysis.

Bleak and Bleaker

Two articles grabbed my attention this morning:

Reading these makes me sad and angry. The mainstream media is bleak enough, but these perspectives from the radical press are beyond bleak. I wish I could say that they are exaggerating, that they go too far, that what they are saying about New Orleans is not true. But I’m afraid they’re telling it like it is.

None of this is news to those of us living here. I only pass these links along in hopes that some more people outside New Orleans will read these articles and get a picture of the enormity of our struggle.

I’m desperate for a glimmer of hope:

Students from sixteen colleges, including Xavier, Tulane, Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College, San José State, Stanford, and University of Michigan have put out a call to all college campuses to participate in a “National Post-Katrina College Summit” for April 9-14.

The Post-Katrina College Summit will be a nationwide, weeklong effort to raise awareness about the Gulf Coast through documentary showings, speakers, spoken word, teach-ins, rallies, petition drives, and other events. The Summit is an attempt to catapult New Orleans and the rest of the Gulf Coast back into the national consciousness and to promote federal legislation for a New Deal-style program for the Gulf Coast.