Film Studio Under Fire — Not!

May 22nd, 2006 by Editor B

I’m disappointed by the spin of this article in City Business —laf the headline in particular. “Film studio under fire”? C’mon. No one is criticizing the LIFT project. In fact, everyone I’ve talked to is pretty excited about it. What we are questioning is process by which the public land was sold.

2 Responses to “Film Studio Under Fire — Not!”

  1. g Says:

    Ah, welcome to the world (view) of City Business:

    “The city calls it good economic development.
    Residents call it a shady land grab. ”

    They have one script and will ensure that every story fits neatly into it. A bit more nuance creeps in later in the story but the lead is hack journalism 101.

    Neighbors vs. Business
    Economic Development vs. Preservation
    blah vs. blah

    Discussions of process are difficult to get the reporters to discuss. Not sure if that is just because it takes more thought or because Terry runs a tight ship over there and ensures that all issues are framed in a way that support his advertisers.

  2. Editor B Says:

    I just submitted this letter to the editor of City Business:

    It was with some chagrin that I read the recent article headlined “Film studio under fire.” The tone of the article and the headline in particular suggest an opposition between neighborhood organizations and the Louisiana Institute of Film Technology that I have not found to be the case. In fact, LIFT has been working with members of the Mid-City Neighborhood Organization and the Fauborg St. John Neighborhood Association on plans to build a three-mile bike path/linear park connecting Armstrong Park to City Park.

    The question that neighbors have been asking about the sale of public land is why our public servants did not do a better job communicating to neighborhood groups. A more accurate headline might have been “City Council under fire.” We know the sale to have been both legal and proper, but it is the duty of Council members to apprise their constituents of significant developments in their neighborhoods.

    This should not obscure the fact that the film studio will be a major boon to the area and indeed the entire region. It will be one of the largest such studios in the country and will provide jobs — and job training — for many locals. It’s worth noting that LIFT is local too, a homegrown production company, not an out-of-state entity. Here at last is a diversification of the local economy beyond the tourism industry. New Orleans needs this project!

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